Disabling your Web Add-in if you have an Equivalent COM/VSTO Add-in

In previous post, I described how you can add code to your VSTO/COM add-in to disable your Web Add-in loaded from maniferst via the Office Portal:
Removing Web Add-in Ribbon Customization in Outlook for Windows (theofficecontext.com)

Well with Outlook for Windows, Office 365, version 16.0.13728.36136, you can now disable your Web Add-in via Policy settings.

Download Administrative Template files (ADMX/ADML) and Office Customization Tool for Microsoft 365 Apps for enterprise, Office 2019, and Office 2016 from Official Microsoft Download Center

Here is the path in the policy editor for this setting:

Once in the policy editor, you would set the value. If your OfficeJS Web Add-in has a GUID of {c5bc7737-0d79-4302-9e73-2a614941e914} and the COM add-in is called “My Full Featured Outlook Add-in“, you would set the values like this:

Specifically, the registry key it puts in place is this:

PATH: HKCU\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Office\16.0\Outlook\addins\equivalentcomaddin
KEY (string/REG_SZ): {OfficeJS GUID}
VALUE: Prog.ID

For example, if I have an Outlook Web Add-in called “My Outlook Add-in” and it has the following manifest entry:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<OfficeApp 
          xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/office/appforoffice/1.1" 
          xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" 
          xmlns:bt="http://schemas.microsoft.com/office/officeappbasictypes/1.0" 
          xmlns:mailappor="http://schemas.microsoft.com/office/mailappversionoverrides/1.0" 
          xsi:type="MailApp">
	<Id>c5bc7737-0d79-4302-9e73-2a614941e914</Id>

Let’s say I have a full VSTO add-in called “My Full Featured Outlook Add-in” and it is registered as the following:

If you were to look at the Policy key after it is set you would have an entry like this:

KEY: {c5bc7737-0d79-4302-9e73-2a614941e914}
VALUE: My Full Featured Outlook Add-in

If it were an older traditional COM Add-in, like the top item: AccessAddin.DC, then it would look like this:

KEY: {c5bc7737-0d79-4302-9e73-2a614941e914}
VALUE: AccessAddin.DC

That is all you have to do if you have the newest builds of Outlook for Windows.

NOTE: Coming later in the year, will be an option to add this entry to your Web Add-in Manifest file the way you can with Excel and Word. 
NOTE: This is all covered in the latest Office add-ins community call.

easyEws Updated to 1.0.20

This was more than a patch this time. It was a minor update to two functions:

  • sendMailItem
  • sendPlainTextEmailWithAttachment

There was an issue reported (#12) where the sendMailItem function was not working in IE11. This was because it was created to take an inline object (ES6). Well on IE11 (which only supports ES5), it broke.

So, I fixed sendMailItem to support ES5 and also took the opportunity to add two often requested features of this function:

  • It will now allow you to submit HTML body content or Text. It will also parse the HTML for you if you submit it as is.
  • It will also now allow you to send both file attachment (new), and mail item attachments (original).

Please see the documentation for more information on the updates to this function: https://github.com/davecra/easyEWS#sendMailItem

Also I updated the sendPlainTextEmailWithAttachment function. Under the covers this uses the sendMailItem function. So I had to update it to use the new format so it would work as well. There was no change to it’s features/functionality however.

I did not get to the last item I have had requests for:

  • ability to specify recipients as To/CC/BCC. I will update this at some future date. Also, please let me know if you would like to see this.

Overall, the goal is to have the sendMailItem() function be a full multi-purpose function at some point. It is almost there, but please keep the suggestions coming.

easyEws v1.0.19 Released

There were a couple small bug fixes in the splitGroupsRecursivelyAsync() function. Thank you to Jack for making me aware of the issue as it has now been corrected.

The CDN to the latest versioned instance of the library:

https://cdn.jsdelivr.net/npm/easyews/easyEws1.0.19.js

Here is a link to my GitHub:

https://github.com/davecra/easyEWS

And it is also able to be installed from NPM with the command:

npm install easyews

Script Lab for Outlook. Yeah!

OMG! This is a day I have been waiting for.

I do a LOT of Outlook Web Add-in development. A lot. I have made the move from Visual Studio to Visual Studio Code, from C# to JavaScript and have not looked back. However, there are a few things that make development in this new area difficult and that is rapid prototyping.

For C#, I could always go into VBA and see how the object model would behave when I needed to test a hypothesis. I was able to use VBA as a laboratory for ideas before I codified them into solid C# code in a VSTO Add-in. But there was no such laboratory in the JavaScript web add-in world, until now…

…Script Lab for Outlook has been released. And the best part, it is available in Outlook on Windows, Outlook on Mac and Outlook on the web!

Script Lab in Outlook for Windows
Script Lab for OWA

If you do a lot of Outlook development this will be a godsend. You will now be able to go into Script Lab and test your code ideas before you add them to your more complex add-in.

Open Outlook, go into the Office Store and type “Script Lab” and Script Lab for Outlook should come up in your list. Select and install it. Then open a message in Outlook and you should see the Script Lab items on the Home tab.

Happy coding!

Detecting Print in Outlook (VSTO/C#)

This is a common problem in Outlook. You might have tried to override the Ribbon settings for Print in Outlook to find that your code never gets run when the user clicks Print.

There is also not any events in the Outlook object model to detect Print either. So if you need to detect the user pressing the print button, you are out of luck.

While it is still not possible to detect the print button being pressed, you can at least detect when the user has selected the Print tab on the backstage.

The following code uses a background thread and a series of Windows API calls to FindWindow/FindWindowEx to detect when the Print tab on the backstage is opened:

[DllImport("user32.dll")]
public static extern IntPtr FindWindow(string lpClassName, string lpWindowName);
[DllImport("user32.dll", SetLastError = true)]
public static extern IntPtr FindWindowEx(IntPtr parentHandle, IntPtr childAfter, string className, string windowTitle);
/// <summary>
/// Startup for Outlook Add-in
/// </summary>
/// <param name="sender"></param>
/// <param name="e"></param>
private void ThisAddIn_Startup(object sender, System.EventArgs e)
{
// we start by creating a background thread and look for a specific
// set of windows to appear, then we know the user clicked print
new Thread(() =>
{
while (true)
{
Thread.Sleep(1000);
CheckForPrint();
}
}).Start();
}
/// <summary>
/// Checks to see if the user has opened backstage and
/// selected the Print tab
/// </summary>
private void CheckForPrint()
{
try
{
// depending on whether we have an inspector active, or the explorer
// active we will need to get the caption to FindWindow
string LstrCaption = "";
if(Application.ActiveWindow() is Outlook.Inspector)
{
// Active inspector caption
LstrCaption = ((Outlook.Inspector)Application.ActiveWindow()).Caption;
}
else if(Application.ActiveWindow() is Outlook.Explorer)
{
// Active explorer caption
LstrCaption = ((Outlook.Explorer)Application.ActiveWindow()).Caption;
}
// get the window handle
IntPtr LintHostHandle = FindWindow(null, LstrCaption);
if (LintHostHandle == IntPtr.Zero) return; // if we cannot find it – nevermind
// create a list of windows to find (in reverse order)
// 4) rctrl_renwnd32 – is the print preview window
// 3) NetUICtrlNotifySink – is whole Print options and preview
// 2) NetUIHWND – is the the entire print tab
// 1) FullpageUIHost – is the backstage page
Stack<string> LobjWindowClasses = new Stack<string> (
new string[] { "rctrl_renwnd32", "NetUICtrlNotifySink", "NetUIHWND", "FullpageUIHost" });
// recursive call back to find each window in the stack.
// if all of them are found, then present a message to the user
if(FindWindowStack(LintHostHandle, LobjWindowClasses))
{
MessageBox.Show("You have clicked on the Print Tab in Outlook.");
}
}
catch { }
}
/// <summary>
/// RECURSIVE
/// This function will take the window classnames in the provided stack
/// and then find each one in order via recursive calls. If all of them
/// are found – we return true = found
/// </summary>
/// <param name="PintHandle"></param>
/// <param name="PobjStack"></param>
/// <returns></returns>
private bool FindWindowStack(IntPtr PintHandle, Stack<string> PobjStack)
{
try
{
// get the window with the classname being popped off the stack
IntPtr LintNewHandle = FindWindowEx(PintHandle, IntPtr.Zero, PobjStack.Pop(), "");
if(LintNewHandle != IntPtr.Zero && PobjStack.Count == 0)
{
return true; // found it
}
else if(LintNewHandle!= IntPtr.Zero)
{
// found a window, but the stack still has items, call next one
return FindWindowStack(LintNewHandle, PobjStack);
}
else
{
// did not find it
return false;
}
}
catch
{
// oops
return false;
}
}

easyEws v1.0.16 Published

I have made a few minor updates to easyEws. First, was a fix for distribution lists with an “&” in the name. The second is a few minor JSDoc updates for better linting. And finally, I changed a couple forEach loops to traditional for loops for performance reasons.

I have published the update to NPM and to my GitHub.

Please let me know if you have any issues or questions.

easyEws v1.0.15 Released

In this latest release I have incorporated my first community pull. A big thank you to Vijay Samtani for adding the sendMailItem. This new addition allows you to create a message to multiple recipients and with zero to many attachments.

Here is a link to the repository: https://github.com/davecra/easyEWS

You can references it in your code:

<script type="text/javascript" src="node_modules/easyews/easyews.min.js"></script>

And you can allow pull it down from NPM:

npm install easyEws

What is Office 365, really?

In my day-to-day dealings with people and organizations, there is a common confusion on the term “Office 365.” And that confusion is fed by a few common myths that I have heard repeated by some very smart people in those organizations. So, first, let me dismiss the myths…

  • The first one is that Office 365 is online, in the browser applications only… NO! Office 365 is NOT just Excel Online, Word Online, PowerPoint Online, Outlook Online, and OneNote Online.
  • And the second myth is that the desktop applications are getting deprecated… NO! Microsoft is NOT doing away with the installed desktop applications on Windows and Mac in favor of web based versions.

So let’s get to the question:

If Microsoft is not replacing Office with web versions, then what the heck is all this Office 365 and cloud stuff then?

Primarily, Office 365 is the name of the subscription. You no longer buy the Office applications on disks and install them, then buy the next version, etc. With the subscription you always get the newest version (and much more). As you will read from the link above, there are lots of FAQ’s and other information that explain how this works.

So Excel Online, ET AL. is PART of the Office 365 subscription based platform. Office 365 still includes the traditional Microsoft Office desktop applications on the PC/Windows or the Mac. And they are not going anywhere. When you hear that your organization is moving to Office 365 it does not mean you will ONLY be accessing Office from a web browser.

Office 365 is really Office anywhere, on any device. For example, Office 365 also includes applications on iPhone, iPad, and Android. And it is not just the traditional applications. There are incredible tools such as Forms, Sway, Teams, and for developers the Graph API. It also shifts workloads like Exchange Server for mail and SharePoint server for document management from local IT servers to servers run by Microsoft in the cloud.

So when you hear Office 365, DO NOT THINK GOOGLE DOCS. wlEmoticon-smile.png The online versions of Office are only there to provide an additional avenues to access Office from anywhere, on any device. Per the Office 365 website:

Works across multiple devices

Get the fully installed Office apps on multiple PCs, Macs, tablets, and mobile devices (including Windows, iOS, and Android).

They are not as fully featured and as such you really need to consider when you might use them over using the traditional Microsoft Office desktop applications. Per this site (my emphasis added):

Office for the web (formerly Office Web Apps) opens Word, Excel, OneNote, and PowerPoint documents in your web browser. Office for the web makes it easier to work and share Office files from anywhere with an internet connection, from almost any device. Microsoft Office 365 customers with Word, Excel, OneNote, or PowerPoint can view, create, and edit files on the go. …

The following tables compare Office for the web feature capabilities to feature-rich Microsoft Office desktop apps.

So, if you like your Excel just the way it is, installed on your scientific workstation with a bazillion gigabytes of RAM, you can still run it there if you move to Office 365. What you get with the traditional Office applications is more frequent, seamless and automatic updates from the web. Per the Office 365 website:

Monthly Updates

Get the latest features and capabilities with fully installed and always up-to-date versions of Outlook, Word, Excel, PowerPoint for Windows or Mac, OneNote (features vary), Teams, and Access and Publisher (PC only).

Hopefully, this has helped clear up and dispel the myths. And when you go back to the smart person that has told you otherwise, and continues to insist and tell you otherwise, please send them here. wlEmoticon-hotsmile.png

easyEws Updated to v1.0.11

It has been a while since I have updated this library, however I have had a few requests.

The first one that I am publishing today is adding the ResolveNames operation. The latest is now on GitHub here. And you can install it using NPM like this:

npm install easyews

Also, I have updated the CDN listing. Before I was using RAWGIT but that has been retired. You can now add the CDN like this:

<html>
<head>
<!– DEBUG –>
<script type="text/javascript" src="https://cdn.jsdelivr.net/gh/davecra/easyEws/easyEws.js"></script>
<!– Or, MINIFIED –>
<script type="text/javascript" src="https://cdn.jsdelivr.net/gh/davecra/easyEws/easyEws.min.js"></script>
</head>
</html>

view raw
easyEwsCDN.html
hosted with ❤ by GitHub

To issue a resolve names you will pass the email address or the display name to the function like this:

async function run() {
var msg = Office.context.mailbox.item;
msg.to.getAsync(function(asyncResult) {
if(asyncResult.status == Office.AsyncResultStatus.Failed) {
$("#recipientResult").text(asyncResult.error);
} else {
/** @type {Office.EmailAddressDetails[]} */
var recips = asyncResult.value;
// are there any recipients at all
if(recips == null || recips.length == 0) {
$("#recipientResult").html("NO RECIPIENTS");
} else {
/** @type {string} */
var info = "<br/>DISPLAY NAME: " + recips[0].displayName + "<br/>" +
"EMAIL_ADDRESS: " + recips[0].emailAddress + "<br/>" +
"RECIPIENT_TYPE: " + recips[0].recipientType;
easyEws.resolveRecipient(recips[0].emailAddress, function(result) {
if(result == null || result.length == 0) {
info += "<br/>UNRESOLVED</br>";
} else {
info += "<br/>RESOLVED: " + result[0].MailBoxType;
info += "<br/>RESOLVED EMAIL: " + result[0].EmailAddress;
}
// write tot he form
$("#recipientResult").html(info);
}, function(error) {
$("#recipientResult").text(error);
}, function(debug) {
$("#debugResult").text(debug)
});
}
}
});
}

view raw
resolveNames.js
hosted with ❤ by GitHub

If you have any suggestions for this library, please ping me.