Testing Office.JS: The Power of Choice


github

You know, sometimes the way you want to do things is not necessarily the right way. And even then the right way makes life so hard you want to cry. With Office.JS I recently blogged about “a way” you can test multiple sprints of your add-in in your development environment: Testing a Web Add-in with Multiple Manifest. In this article I explain a method of creating multiple manifests to point to each “version or sprint” of your add-in. Recently, I found that one of my customers threw a wrinkle into that idea. Not that creating multiple manifests was impossible, but they were needing two conflating factors:

  1. Each sprint points to a different folder of HTML/JS.
  2. And they needed to use query string parameters (like this post) to load one of maybe 20 different configuration settings.

With up to 20 configurations per sprint and lets say 4 sprints, you end up with 80 manifest files. So, this is untenable. You need more choices, then enter necessity… wlEmoticon-hotsmile.png

So, lets say you need to test multiple configurations and multiple sprints. Here is how you will set this up:

  • You will publish each sprint of your Web Site Project  into a different folder in IIS. Like this:
folder
Different sprints in separate folders
  • Then, you will create a new HTML page. I called mine Launcher.html. This page will contain a submit button and two drop-down select controls:
    • One for sprints
    • One for configs
  • Next, you will modify your manifest. You can add a new button called “Sprint Testing” for example and have it launch: Launcher.html.
  • In the Launcher.JS, populate those dropdowns. You can populate these hard coded into the HTML, from your client side JS or call your service controller. In my example, I call my service controller.
  • When the user clicks the submit button after choosing the desired settings, you will build the URL to the proper sprint folder and then append the config values to the current query string (that last item is critical so that your sprint Compose/Read page will get the important Office related query string values passed to it). You will see I do this below by replacing my “launcher.html”, replacing it will the new path, then append the config setting:
url = window.location.href.replace("launcher.html", sprint + "/ComposeMessage.html");
url += "&Config=" + config;
  • Once done your code will perform a location.replace() on the url and you will have your proper sprint and configuration loaded. You will only have a single manifest file and you will be able to test/regress test as much as needed with different sprints and configurations.

Here is what the HTML page I created looks like when loaded:

launcherpane

 

Here is the HTML:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
    <title>Select Which Sprint to Launch</title>
    <meta charset="utf-8" />
    <script src="https://appsforoffice.microsoft.com/lib/1/hosted/office.js" type="text/javascript"></script>
    <script src="Scripts/jquery-3.1.1.js" type="text/javascript"></script>
    <script src="launcher.js" type="text/javascript"></script>
</head>
<body>
<h3>Please select the sprint you wish to launch:</h3>
<select id="selectSprintList">
</select>
<h3>Please select the configuration:</h3>
<select id="selectConfigList">
</select>
    <button id="launchSprintButton">Submit</button>
</body>
</html>

Here is the code behind for the page:

/// <reference path="Scripts/jquery-3.1.1.js" />
(function () {
    'use strict';

    Office.initialize = function (reason) {
        $(document).ready(function (reason) {
            /// Upon load connect to the server and request
            /// the sprints so that we can fill the select
            /// field on the form.
            makeAjaxCall("GetSprints", null, function (response) {
                /** @type {String} */
                var data = response.Message.toString();
                /** @type {String[]} */
                var results = data.split(",");
                $.each(results, function (index, value) {
                    $("#selectSprintList").append("
<option>" + value + "</option>");
                })
            }, function (error) {
                $(document).append("

" + error + "

");
            });

            makeAjaxCall("GetConfigs", null, function (response) {
                /** @type {String} */
                var data = response.Message.toString();
                /** @type {String[]} */
                var results = data.split(",");
                $.each(results, function (index, value) {
                    $("#selectConfigList").append("
<option>" + value + "</option>");
                })
            });

            $("#launchSprintButton").click(function (event) {
                /// The user clicked the submit button. Build the URL
                /// from the selection in the select control and
                /// change the location
                var sprint = $("#selectSprintList").val();
                var config = $("#selectConfigList").val();
                var url = "";
                if (sprint != null && sprint != "" &&
                    config != null && sprint != "") {
                    // replace the launcher page with the proper sprint folder location,
                    // but be sure to keep all the query string values - to pass on
                    // to our OfficeJS page. However, add our one config setting to the end
                    url = window.location.href.replace("launcher.html", sprint + "/ComposeMessage.html");
                    url += "&Config=" + config;
                    // replace the url
                    location.replace(url);
                }
            });

        });
    }
})();

// Helper function to call the web service controller
makeAjaxCall = function (command, params, callback, error) {
    var dataToPassToService = {
        Command: command,
        Params: params
    };
    $.ajax({
        url: 'api/Default',
        type: 'POST',
        data: JSON.stringify(dataToPassToService),
        contentType: 'application/json;charset=utf-8',
        headers: { 'Access-Control-Allow-Origin': '*' },
        crossDomain: true
    }).done(function (data) {
        callback(data);
    }).fail(function (status) {
        error(status.statusText);
    })
};

And here is the code for the controller, now, I cheated and just returned a string value for each call, but this at least help you get the idea of how to build your own list for sprints and configs:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Net;
using System.Net.Http;
using System.Web.Http;

namespace OutlookLauncherDemoWeb.Controllers
{
    public class DefaultController : ApiController
    {
        ///
<summary>
        /// Service Request - incoming
        /// </summary>

        public class WebServiceRequest
        {
            public string Command { get; set; }
            public string[] Params { get; set; }
        }

        ///
<summary>
        /// Service Response - outgoing
        /// </summary>

        public class WebServiceResponse
        {
            public string Status { get; set; }
            public string Message { get; set; }
        }

        [HttpPost()]
        public WebServiceResponse Values(WebServiceRequest request)
        {
            WebServiceResponse response = null;
            switch (request.Command)
            {
                case "GetSprints":
                    return getSprints();
                case "GetConfigs":
                    return getConfigs();
            }

            response = new WebServiceResponse();
            response.Message = "Unknown command";
            return response;
        }

        private WebServiceResponse getConfigs()
        {
            WebServiceResponse response = new WebServiceResponse();
            response.Message = "Config1,Config2,Config3,Config4,Config5,Config6,Config7,Config8";
            return response;
        }

        private WebServiceResponse getSprints()
        {
            WebServiceResponse response = new WebServiceResponse();
            response.Message = "sprint1,sprint2,sprint3,sprint4";
            return response;
        }
    }
}

The idea here is that this add-in is a baseline for yours. You can build these components into a debug build of your add-in and it will call into each separate folder/sprint where you have posted previous versions.

I have published the full source up on GitHub: https://github.com/davecra/OutlookLauncherDemo

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